BUNNIES!!! 50 Word Review

Bunnies!!! CoverObtain a copy of this book and a few preschoolers. Read. Repeat.

Need more than that? Okay. In BUNNIES!!!, author Kevan Atteberry captures the enthusiasm and energy of preschoolers and packages it in book form. The story is simple, but I’m willing to bet it will become a read-aloud favorite.

HOW RUDE! 50 Word Review

Click to view the book at IndieBound. Image credit: IndieBound

Heather Montgomery’s HOW RUDE! is a gleeful romp through “bad” bug behavior with exactly the right amount of gross to appeal to its audience. The illustrations of anthropomorphized cartoon bugs along with photos of the actual animal strike a good balance between fun and accuracy. Great for preschoolers through elementary.

Show & Tell, February 5, 2016

This week the backyard is full of tiny holes, which I can only surmise were made by our resident squirrels digging up the nuts they hid last fall. It makes the yard look like a miniature battle zone. Guess it’s time to go refill the feeders.

This week the backyard is full of tiny holes, which I can only surmise were made by our resident squirrels digging up the nuts they hid last fall. It makes the yard look like a miniature battle zone. Guess it’s time to go refill the feeders.

Books & Such

My favorite genre to write is narrative nonfiction—usually picture books. Typically, these books have some kind of narrative arc throughout, with additional facts and fascinating details in sidebars on each page.

The book I’m highlighting today is just such a book. Behold the Beautiful Dung Beetle, by Cheryl Bardoe, illustrated by Alan Marks, celebrates an often-overlooked creature with an important job. There is just a hint of poop humor and a big pinch of respect in this lovely book that covers why the dung beetle is a “dung” beetle and how its life cycle works.

Sidebars explore the body parts of a beetle, the different kinds of dung beetles, and even the dung beetle’s honored place in Egyptian culture.

Image credit: IndieBound. Click to view at IndieBound. Please support your local, independent bookseller.

Behold the Beautiful Dung Beetle was published by Charlesbridge in 2014.

I Can’t Wait to Read . . .

. . . The Slowest Book Ever, by April Pulley Sayre

April Pulley Sayre is one of my favorite nonfiction authors. If you don’t already know her work, I encourage you to go to the library and check out a stack of her books. I especially love Raindrops Roll and Vulture View.

Sayre’s new book, The Slowest Book Ever is a 176 page middle grade book, which is a departure from her usual picture book format. School Library Journal says, “Science and nature rub shoulders with pop culture and history in Sayre’s ode to slowness . . . The tone is humorous but never silly, and the facts are backed up with sources and more details in the endnotes. The light tone and engaging writing are perfectly complemented by the pen-and-ink drawings that accompany every entry, and the design invites lingering and sharing.”

There is a sloth on the cover, which makes me happy, and Kelly Murphy’s illustrations look great. Definitely looking forward to this one. It releases on April 5, 2016, from Boyd’s Mill Press.

Show & Tell: January 29, 2016

The first sign of spring in my backyard are the elongated catkins and diminutive blooms of the beaked hazelnut. Though there are other hints of spring lurking everywhere, the hazelnuts are the first to openly defy winter. Later in the spring, a pair of nuts will grow from eat tiny flower. The nuts will spark a raucous feeding frenzy of jays and squirrels later in the year, but for now, all is quiet except for the buzz of a few hardy honeybees dodging raindrops to visit the first flowers.

The first sign of spring in my backyard are the elongated catkins and diminutive blooms of the beaked hazelnut. Though there are other hints of spring lurking everywhere, the hazelnuts are the first to openly defy winter. Later in the spring, a pair of nuts will grow from each tiny flower. The nuts will spark a raucous feeding frenzy of jays and squirrels, but for now, all is quiet except for the buzz of a few hardy honeybees dodging raindrops to visit the first flowers.

Books & Such

I have an eclectic group of books to share this week. The first is The Grand Mosque of Paris, by Karen Gray Ruelle and Deborah Durland Desaix. This storybook (a narrative picture book with longer text) tells how people at the Grand Mosque of Paris helped save Jews during the German occupation of France in WWII. This little-known story was new to me. In light of post WWII Muslim/Jew relations, it is at once heartwarming and heartbreaking.

The book is perfect for story time with older elementary students or for kids to read on their own. School Library Journal recommends the book for Grades 4-6. I think it’s lovely for older kids and adults too.

The second book is I, Fly, by Bridget Hoes. Illustrated by Jennifer Plecas. This fun and funny book features a fly trying to convince kids that they should study flies instead of butterflies. The fly giving the students a lesson gives the book a nice narrative arc, and it’s stuffed with all kinds of kid-friendly amazing facts and disgusting details.

School Library Journal recommends the book for Grades 2-4. I think younger kids would enjoy it as well, even if they don’t make it through the entire book.

Image credit: IndieBound. Please support your local, independent bookseller.

The last book is Book of Nature Poetry, edited by J. Patrick Lewis. I really adore this and Book of Animal Poetry, also edited by Lewis. Both bring together a collection of new and classic poets, perfect for sharing poetry with kids in bite-sized pieces. I’ve been known to interrupt evening TV time to read a poem from these collections that I found especially wonderful. Sharing poetry in this way feels so much more organic than “now we shall study this great poet—tada!” Start reading this book to kids a bit a time when they are little, and poetry won’t seem like such a strange and foreign beast when they encounter it in formal study.

I Can’t Wait to Read . . .

Jess Keating (My Life is a Zoo series) has a new nonfiction picture book releasing February 2. I’ve been waiting for Pink is for Blobfish for a long time. Who can resist a book that turns princess-y pink on its ear? Monster slugs, poisonous insects, and an adorable blobfish—count me in!

Upcoming Appearances

I’ll be presenting my writing workshop, “A Dark and Stormy Night: The Importance of Setting,” to the Young Willamette Writers next week. If you have young writers in your family (5th-10th grade) and are in the Portland Metro area, please join me. For more details, click here.

Show & Tell: Friday, January 15, 2016

How to Swallow a Pig, the latest title from Steve Jenkins & Robin Page. Click to view at IndieBound, credit: IndieBound

My first Show & Tell for 2016 is the work of Steve Jenkins. Mr. Jenkins is an author/illustrator who frequently collaborates with his wife, Robin Page. Among his works are some of my all-time favorite nonfiction titles for kids. He shares my love for the wild and weird in the natural world, with books that range from how animals sleep and bathe to animal life spans and communication. If I’m holding a book in my hand and saying “but I was going to write about that,” chances are it’s a Steve Jenkins book.

Most of Mr. Jenkins titles are categorical in nature, meaning they take a topic like taking a bath and tell you a bit about how many different kinds of animals bathe. Because his books aren’t typically narratives, they’re great for exploring a little bit at a time (or all at once) and they’re lovely for young preschoolers who might not sit through a whole story or who want to flip back and forth and skip pages. The content is also detailed enough for older siblings to appreciate, so they’re great for a family story-time.

Some of my favorite Steve Jenkins titles are (you’ll find a complete list of his titles here):